Posts Tagged With: Cesare al Casaletto

10 Best Things We Ate in Rome

Cannoli from Ciuri CiuriI know what you thinking.  No, I’m not auditioning for a hand model job.  Although the hands are normally this photogenic this is not the main motivation behind this post, and you should really pay more attention to the beautiful Canollo (single Connoli.  Yes you’ve been living a lie).  With that said, if you insist, who am I to prevent what people want and need.  Drop me a line at ZiggysHands@Gmail.com, also on twitter @handyjobs.

Roma delivered some tasty surprises.  I was all ready to be wowed by all the Cacios and the Pepes, and the Carbonaras, but instead I was impressed by the more familiar items like Meatballs, Mortadella, Burratas and Pizzas.  So in no particular order, our top eats in Rome…

Pizza at Da Remo – Although I’ve been to Rome before this was the first time I experienced the classic Roman “Matzoh” thin pizza.  We enjoyed this one more than the former Michelin star spot we had for lunch in Orvieto that day.  Margherita and the Diavola (like sopressata back home) were spot on, but once we added more toppings things started to get off track a little.  So stay simple with the Matsoh Pizza.  Fun and supposedly flirtatious staff (at least according to RomeDigest.com.  They probably did not notice the hands) lets you take all the pictures you want of the hectic action inside.

Pizza at Da Remo

Fettuccine Agli Ovoli at La Campana.  Ovoli (pronounced delicious) is sort of a rare, expensive mushroom that is bright, sweet, delicate, almost truffle like.  The whole mushroom is a weird egg like shape (hence Ovoli).  The Italians like to call them as they see it.  (E.G Strozzapreti obviously invented when someone witnessed a priest being strangled).  La Campana is one of those proud establishments with a rich history dating back to the 16th century.  And the best part: Open on Sundays!

Fettuccine Agli Ovoli at La Campana

Seafood Assortment at Le Mani in Pasta.  Terrific finish to an uneven meal at this popular seafood institution in Trastevere.  Fantastic hefty juicy Langoustines, wonderfully chewy flat squid, lightly breaded and grilled to perfection, and a nice whole white fish.  Borrowing from the Hummus Whisperer, we attacked this thing with full force.

Seafood Assortment at Le Mani in Pasta

Gelsi Neri Granita at Ciuri Ciuri – Nothing, no ice cream or a slap in the face, during the entire trip felt as refreshing as this dark beauty.  Sweet but not too sweet.  Is it a blackberry?  Well if it is, its not like any blackberry I ever had.  Reminds me more of the white berry I ate in Israel.  There’s a Borat “Black Not” joke in here somewhere.

Gelsi Neri Granita at Ciuri Ciuri

Burrata from Roscioli – Just edging the sleek, paper thin Mortadella which is what Mrs Ziggy would have picked.  The Burrata, creamy, rich and ever so memorable.  But what stole the show was the semi-dried peppery tomatoes I couldnt get enough of.  Promise me you will get both dishes.  Or we are no longer friends

Roscioli - Burrata

Sliced Pizza from Forno Campo de’ Fiori – Fitting entry right after my post on Sullivan Street Bakery and its room temperature pizza bianca.  If Pizza Bianca (white pizza for those scoring at home, or if you are alone) like in Sullivan was more popular in NYC it would be hot off the oven as opposed to room temperature.  We enjoyed a few slices at this Forno.  Delicious plain, chewy bianca, and one topped with tomatoes.  Bread, salt, olive oil never tasted this good.

Forno Campo de' Fiori

Meatballs from Cesare al Casaletto – Another tough choice here between the meatballs and the super flavorful oxtail.  Add the lightly fried gnocchi to the mix and you got yourself a nice meal at this far enough from the tourists stop (oh those pesky tourists).  The meatballs were some of the most unique balls I ever had.   Airy, slow cooked savory brisket meatballs with just enough creamy pesto. Yum yum yum.

Cesare al Casaletto - meatballs

Biscotti and Cookies from Biscottificio Innocenti – Like eating Biscotti and cookies for the very first time.  Tucked on the quiet side of Trastevere is this 100 year old bakery/factory.  Just walk in and ask for an assortment.  Score one big one for Katie Parla

Innocenti

Fettuccine from Il Sorpasso.  With pesto, zucchini flowers and sunflower seeds.  Need I say more?  Yes I probably should.  Perhaps the single best pesto sauce I ever ate.  There!  One of 3 excellent non-Roman pastas we shared here after some fantastic cheese and cured meats.  A perfect lunch spot after the Vatican

Sorpasso

Cannoli from Ciuri Ciuri – (Picture on top).  Yes, 2 items from Ciuri. a place so good you say it twice.  The trick about good Cannoli is seeing empty shells, which means a fresh fill of that ricotta goodness when you order.  Cannoli lovers – look no further!  Well, you can look further.  Its just an expression.

Categories: Italy, Rome | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Cesare al Casaletto – Another Useless Rome Post

Cesare al Casaletto - meatballsContinuing my streak of useless Rome posts I will now write about our last meal in Italy.  Why is a post about this particular meal useless you ask?  Well, good question Timmy! The answer lies with Google and the reason I picked this place in the first place.  Virtually every Rome blogger and their nonnas has already blogged about Cesare since they opened a few years ago.  Some of them even show you the same pictures like the Kodak friendly meatballs and the fried gnocchi.  I really don’t have much new to offer here.  The Oxtail?  Looks like that tip was already covered by Katie Parla.  “off the beaten path”, “Last stop on #8 tram”, “Only locals”, “gotta have the fried stuff”, bla bla bla, all of that was already covered extensively.  Perhaps I could add a picture of myself trying to smile but that would just make things more awkward and may ruin any appetite you may have, or may make you moody.  I got nothing but reconfirm what the locals already said.  Cesare al Casaletto has left us impressed.

Cesare al Casaletto - wineIts almost like every major Italian tourist destination has this line in the sand.  Cross the line and you dine with the locals.  Cesare is well beyond the line but extremely easy to get to especially if you are staying in Trastevere.  Take tram #8 all the way to the last stop, about 15 minutes from the river, and its right there on Casaletto street.

I almost didnt make it to Cesare after seeing less than glowing reviews on the boards.  But then it hit me.  Caicos Cafe in Turks and Caicos is just about my favorite restaurant in the world, but does not always get rave reviews from visitors.  So just like I expect my friends and family to trust my judgement on Caicos Cafe I decided to stop reading and start trusting.

The menu here reads like a roman cuisine dictionary with a surprising English translation for such a residential area trattoria away from the center.  Within an hour the place got filled with locals.  How do I know they were all locals?  Well for starters everyone got kisses from the staff except us.  I tried forcing a wet one but the young waiter got a little confused.Cesare al Casaletto

Appetizer portion of the menu consisted of all sorts of fried staff which is a specialty here.  Started with a very interesting and very generous fried gnocchi on a bed of light cream. Terrific, although the the gnocchi loving little ones declared their preference for the regular kind.  Tough to argue but this was satisfyingly unique nonetheless.  Excellent fresh succulent mussels here. The reason we order them everywhere is because the kids ask for them every time they see them.  But the star of the apps and perhaps the entire meal was probably the meatballs with pesto. Not the meatballs your mamma used to make. Better!  Like an airy slow cooked savory brisket balls.  Well done!

Cesare al Casaletto - bruschettaThe pastas were fine here but again the least memorable course as was the case with all the meals in Rome not named Sorpasso.  More of a testament to the other courses here really. You select a pasta type and the classic preparation. I wanted another Carbonara and Cacio but the wife said lets try something else so I opted for a Gricia with Tonarelli and Bucatini Amatriciana which was more satisfying. I realized I prefer all the classics over the Gricia overall.  Roman pastas to me is like Mexican food. A 3 to 5 ingredient shuffle.  Pasta, Pecorino, Guanciale, black pepper, egg or tomato sauce.  Stuff I would eat over Mexican food any time of course.

Another winner was the last course of oxtail stew. Chunky, falling of the bone juicy, tomatoee, packed with flavor meat.  Although I forgot to take a picture of this one since we were so engaged telling the kids the story of Maximus (gladiator).  I took pictures of pretty much every single dish on this trip except this last one

We skipped dessert this time and left very satisfied.  For the price perhaps the best dinner in Rome (70 something. 100 euros less than Roscioli).

Special thanks to Hande of Vino Roma for all her help with the restaurant choices.  Thanks Hande!

Cesare al Casaletto - fried gnocchi Cesare al Casaletto - Tonarelli Gricia Cesare al Casaletto - Bucatini Amatriciana Cesare al Casaletto - mussels

Categories: Italy, Rome | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.