Posts Tagged With: Travel

The Case For Cisternino

You may not know how to pronounce it, but have probably heard of Puglia or Apulia. You may even heard of Bari, Alberobello, Lecce, and your British aunt may have mentioned Polignano a Mare once or twice. But unless you’ve been researching Puglia extensively, you probably never heard of Cisternino. Blame Puglia’s wealth of stunners, many of which concentrated at the heart of Puglia, Itria Valley. I cant think of another Italian region that boasts such wealth in such proximity.

Cisternino therefore is easy to overlook, but I’d argue that its the best base to explore the region with a car. Most pick the more famous Ostuni, 20 km to the south. But Cisternino is not only better positioned, but has a lot of things going for it. It reminds me of the Varenna and Bellagio situation in Lake Como. Its a small mystery why most chose Bellagio to this day where Varenna is not only more convenient, but arguably as attractive.

Draw the main sites in Valle d’Itria, and you’ll find Cisternino smack in the middle of it all. 30 is the magic number. Less than 30 minutes to another white stunner, Locorotondo, the mentioned Ostuni, and mother of Capocollo, Martina Franca. Food heaven Ceglie Messapica and the great Cibus is 16 km away. Cisternino is not only surrounded by Trulli but Trulli capital Alberobello is less than 30 minutes away. Then 30 minutes down the shore you got Polignano a Mare and Monopoli. And the nearby stretch between Savelletri and Torre Canne not only boasts some of the best beaches in the area, but known for its seafood.

Sometimes you come across a place that ticks all your boxes. One of mine is not only good food, but preferably a place that specializes in something. Cisternino is known for the Fornello Pronto, a network of butchers that will barbecue the meat of choice on the spot. Walk in, choose your meat, pay, and grab a table. Might as well make that meat another local specialty, Bombette, small meat rolls stuffed with cheese and pancetta, though you may find various variations.

But if you happen to lead a largish group like I did, or simply seek a more traditional sit down, there are no shortages here. Family owned and operated Ristorante Mezzofanti, recommended by our host, is literally a hidden gem in a quiet corner of the old town. Try the baked Entrecote with breadcrumbs, and honey mustard. Neapolitanish Pizzeria Doppio Zero is dope! And quite popular so make reservations.

Dining options get even more interesting in the country side. One is Il Cortiletto, a Slow Food guide recommendation in the tiny village of Speziale. Here you’ll find a charming cameo appearance of the chicken, and an exceptional version of the Altamura specialty Tette delle Monache, that may or may not be safe to Google at work (its means Nun’s tits). Another option is Masseria Il Frantoio for a family style set menu dinner in a striking environment. If you overlook the lavish wedding service, you’ll enjoy the elevated traditional grandma cooking with matching wine.

You dont have to stay inside Cisternino in order enjoy it, although waking up inside the empty old town is probably an experience in itself. The beauty in this part of Puglia is the variety of accommodations like Trulli, Masserias, or both (Masserias with Trulli). Consider Masseria Cervarolo, or the more subdued and homey Spetterrata, a short 15 minute drive from Cisternino, and 20 from Ostuni.

Categories: Italy, Puglia | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Top 10 Things We Ate in Iceland

I never imagined I would ever write a top 10 food post on Iceland but here we are. Iceland reputation doesnt quite extend to food, and I’ve been warned by some that this is one heck of a challenging area. Maybe all they ate was fermented shark and Sour Ram Testicles to reach this conclusion? The more traditional Icelandic food like Plokkfiskur (fish stew) most likely wont thrill your taste buds, but that doesnt mean that they are the dominant menu items, other than perhaps on food tours. Fresh Seafood, especially Cod, its cousin Ling, and Arctic char reign supreme, whether baked, grilled, or in soup form. Same goes for Lamb, though I suppose it was a fail for us since it didnt make this cut. I did not include the usual suspects you see in every blog like Skyr and Hot Dogs. These are more specific, and obscure items.

Baked Arctic Char at Skal! (Reykjavik)

The dish that set the stage for a 10 day fishorama. Skal! is more like something you can find in NYC including its food court home (the first food court in Iceland) but with these kind of ingredients I’m not complaining. The fish is not much of a looker but was cooked to perfection. The Char is most likely the signature dish here but dont overlook the expertly cooked skirt steak, and the outstanding roasted sunchokes (Jerusalem artichoke)

Date Pesto at Gilbakki (Hellissandur)

If Gilbakki feels like eating at someone’s house that’s probably because it is. Or it looks like it at least. I was not in liberty to inspect or ask for a nap instead of dessert. Calling this spread Pesto may cause people turn in their grave in the beautiful cemetery in Genoa, the Pesto capital of the world. But its a very agreeable thick mix of dates, olives, nuts, and cheese that comes with a bagel. The curried fish soup here is not too shabby either. And the location, in sleepy Hellissandur, a mini Wynwood if you will, the mural capital of Iceland, is another reason to visit.

Seafood Soup at Sjávarborg (Hvammstangi)

When I asked the waitress if there are more restaurants in Hvammstangi, she started to laugh. I took it as a no as I didnt find any myself. Its good to have a monopoly but it was the food quality that made us backtrack 12 km after we were done with Kolugljúfur Canyon. We sampled more fish soup in Iceland than all our years in college combined, and this was the best of the bunch. Chunks of fresh delicious fish in a well balanced broth.

Fish of the Day at Naustið (Husavik)

Will Ferrell’s hometown of Husavik is one of Iceland’s worst kept secrets. But finding food that isnt catered to the whale watching crowds was a little challenging. That meant two visits to the excellent Naustið, something we rarely do abroad. After trying much of the menu its not a surprise that the best dish was a simply grilled Fish of the Day. Some of the fish we tried in Iceland was lacking just enough texture, but this Blue Ling (Cod’s fat uncle) was firm, and perfectly flaky.

Fish and Chips at Fancy Sheep (Seydisfjordur)

Fish, fish, fish, fish soup, fish. See a theme here? Well, thats the end of it as we started to experience fish fatigue by this point. We had fish and Chips three times during this trip and this was by far the best one. Nothing fancy here. Just great, thin batter, and none of the mushiness you often get with Fish and Chips. Fantastic fries.. err.. chips to boot. Even the Tartar sauce is better than average. This truck is run by a duo that’s in the happiness business, giving the obligatory jumps at the nearby rainbow church road extra oomph

Steak Tartare at Fosshotel Glacier Lagoon

Another unexpected delight. Staying in seemingly a middle of nowhere chain hotel, it felt like I struck gold with this so called appetizer. It was not only a Piedmont style expertly done chop, but big enough to be a main course. We couldnt finish it. These flavors came especially handy while the couple sitting next to us insisted on discussing politics. I thought that was the point of vacation these days. This Fosshotel also produced the best breakfast hotel of the trip

Seafood Pasta at Kjarr (Kirkjubæjarklaustur)

Kirkjubæjarklaustur, say it three times. Ok, say it once. Seven days without pasta was a proud moment, but enough is enough. This unassuming newish Italianish was just what the doctor ordered. There were other standouts like the Tiramisu, but the star was seafood with Squid Ink Taglioloni that wasnt terribly far from what you get in the motherland. The view of the twin waterfalls added to the magic. In the US this would have been a state park, while in Iceland its just another corner.

Langoustines at Fjöruborðið (Stokkseyri)

After some big fails the previous few days, and an amazing day spent hiking Landmannalaugar we really needed this one. A three course feast of langoustine soup, langoustines with potatoes and other veggies, and dessert. These Danish beauties were buttery, garlicky, and unlike Hofn Langoustines (see next) just the proper texture. You know things are working when we dont talk to each for over 10 minutes (and its not a fight). Even the beer here, Ulfrun Session (available only in the summer) was a notch above the rest we tried.

Skyr Dessert at Pakkhús (Höfn)

This may confuse some folks that are well too familiar with Iceland or those serial researchers that read about Höfn being the Langoustine capital of Iceland. You would think the Langoustine would get smart by now and swim elsewhere. But there’s no need for that as Iceland is in the midst of a fishing pause so Langoustines are imported these days. Still, we enjoyed Langoustines here even though we found them on the softer side. But it was really the dessert that got our attention. Beautiful layers of Skyr mousse, Tahiti vanilla, ample crunchy crumble and caramel. An absolute Triumph.

Love Balls (Ástarpungar) at Almar Bakari (Hella)

This was the best little snack that we heard nothing about prior to the trip. Nothing earth shattering, just tasty ball shaped donuts, usually with raisins but flavors defer. They are called Love Balls because Ballsacks the literal translation of Ástarpungar doesnt sound as appetizing. To most at least. We first discovered them at the charming Beitarhúsið in the North but the orange flavored Schweddy Balls at Almar won us all over.

Honorable mentions:

Cinnamon Buns and anything really at Brauð & Co

Hot Dog at Bæjarins Beztu Pylsur

Rye Bread Ice Cream at Café Loki

Burger at Vogafjós Farm Resort

Beef Carpaccio at Gistihúsið – Lake Hótel Egilsstaðir

Categories: Iceland | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Soul Kitchen {Matera} – When Ziggy Met Mimmo

Soul Kitchen

Unlike the old guards like Anthony Bourdain, today’s TV food personalities are in the dangerous habit of hugging every chef they meet. It seems a bit more natural to chief hugger Phil Rosenthal than Stanley Tucci who occasionally forces it uncomfortably. But whether the hug recipients like it or not, its really the ultimate sign of respect and validation for their hard work. Since we are mostly a polite species, words can only do so much. But for me, in order to waltz into a kitchen to hug the chef, at the very least I need to get a little intimate with his/her meat. I dont care how that sounds.

So perhaps for the 5th time in my life I hugged a chef. It happened in Matera, during Covid times no less. Judging by the firmness of the youngest of the two brothers who run the excellent Soul Kitchen, the feeling I assume was mutual. It was the type of hug you only see in funerals. The equivalent of roughly 500 Google reviews, or 700 Trip Advisor. By the end of the evening, I was at the home of a newly discovered and favorite cousin where we can argue about politics, and Eurovision songs. You just cant talk about Bruno or bread. Matera vs Altamura can be a touchy subject.

Some meals are like movies. They start a bit shaky, and can turn into epics. A table mix-up with another group resulted in some uncomfortable moments but all ended well. I’m always careful abroad with jokes that may not translate well, but I let one get away this time. Other personalities would have kicked us out, but not this loveable teddy bear. I haven’t met the older brother, but I can only imagine that he possesses the same passion as the younger Mimmo. You can see it in his eyes, hear it in his voice, and definitely taste it in his creations.

Mimmo, with high end stints in Miami and other cities, pays homage to Matera specialties like the appropriately named Crapiata (rustic local bean soup) but at the same time can elevate with flair. Most in the know, come here to experience the outstanding Podolica (the southern answer to Chianina and Fassone) Ribeye. This expertly cooked cut ranks up there with anything we had in Tuscany.

And then you have the Risotto with Porcini, a trip spoiler in a way. Just about every mushroomless Risotto whether its red wine or cheese based, tastes inferior after this. Another standout was a Panna Cotta with Crusco peppers and orange infused olive oil. When you finish one of those meals with a dessert like this, its like culinary extasy. Hence what followed. We had other dishes but these were the memorable ones.

In one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world, the gastronomy scene is still in its infancy. In my brief time in Matera I didnt get a chance to try much, but you get the sense that its already an especially competitive environment. Soul Kitchen is full of just that and is as solid as its its rock cave home.

Categories: Italy, Puglia | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

48 Hours in Florence

Da Ruggero

That’s the amount of time I recommend spending in Florence if the purpose of the trip is to leave your kid there to study. Because not many humans can stomach more than 48 warnings and suggestions on how to secure your personal belongings. Thats roughly 48 dad warnings, followed by half a dozen mom snap-backs at dad. Even monks, and pickpockets at some point go “Alora, enough already. As long as she doesnt have Cappuccino after 10 she’ll be fine”. But I digress. A little early this time.

If you’ve been to Florence before, and you dream about seeing naked David again, prepare for a shock if you are returning anytime soon. Post Covid revenge travel is real, as everyone’s mom, neighbor, and accountant is talking about travelling to Italy these days. We arrived to Florence from “Florence of the south”, Lecce. As popular as Lecce was, Florence made Lecce feel like a remote sleepy hill village. Even the taxis had trouble navigating the crowds. I imagine Rome and Venice are not much different these days.

But Florence is still Florence, and there’s only one Florence. Even the Florence of the south is nothing like Florence of the north. Art, monuments, amazing food, and history on display particularly at the time of our visit. When you see a makeshift stadium built in front of Santa Croce, it can be one of two things. Either a Taylor Swift request was lost in translation, or its Calcio Storico time. Luckily for us it was the latter and we managed to score tickets to one of the semifinals. If you are not familiar with Calcio Storico, Ask Jeeves can probably explain better than Football, Wrestling, Rugby, Kick Boxing, and Couch Potato (When one sits on an an opponent back for 20 minutes for some reason) combined into one. Its one of those events that would never be allowed in the US.

When you revisit such cities, you often revisit a favorite place. To me that place in Florence is Da Ruggero, a quintessential trattoria passed from generation to generation, firmly outside of the tourist route. Traditional Tuscan food doesnt get much better than this. The Tuscan Crostini has quite a bit more oomph than the typical version you find all over the region. Some consider the Pappa al Pomodoro the best in town. Loved introducing my kid to it in between warnings. Salumi, outrageous as always. And the pastas, seemingly so little effort, and yet so much flavor. My happy place in Florence.

All’Antico Vinaio

Since our accommodations this time were at the roomy and peaceful Residenza Marchesi Pontenani near Gladiator arena (Santa Croce), it was hard to avoid the craziness surrounding All’Antico Vinaio these days. On my last visit, roughly 8 years ago, All’Antico Vinaio was just another good sandwich shop. Today its the L’As du Fallafel of Florence and then some. They practically took over an entire block with multiple lines, police directing traffic, teens posing with the overstuffed sandwiches for selfies, and countless picnicking on the curb. I wasnt even tempted to try it. Ok, maybe a little. But I had other plans…

When in Bistecca city, you just have to have the, you guessed it, Gelato. Its not just a matter of which Gelato, but how many times a day. My old rule of picking anything that begins with “Car” is in serious jeopardy now that Carapina is no more. Though Carabè is still going strong. But on this trip, I settled on another old fave, Gelateria dei Neri where I ate three times in two days. EWZ historians tell me its a new EWZ record. The only unforced error was that only one of the tries was the sick Ricotta and Fig combo.

Nugolo

I had other plans for dinner that evening. But when we checked out the place that shall remain nameless earlier, we got a slight bad vibe. Plan B however turned out to be a smashing success. Nugolo is a little far from traditional Tuscan. In fact its closer to what one can find in Paris. But I was intrigued by it after seeing its name pop on the excellent Girl in Florence. And FOMO completed when Nugolo was featured on Stanley Tucci’s new show on CNN before it even opened.

At Nugolo the decor is smart, colorful, playful, and really so is the food to match. The rabbit ragu for instance comes hiding beneath the Risotto for a lasting, milky spoonful. Another clever combination was the slow cooked egg (64 degrees) inside a kataifi nest, with green peas and potato foam, and pancetta. Fresh pasta in a form of “Bottoni” are just that, buttons, stuffed with red potatoes and ‘nduja, and topped with broth of mussels and wild rocket (Arugula) sauce. The Beef tartare was probably the lone forgettable dish. Monkfish, taccole beans, pine nut cream and crusco peppers was superb. So was the Veal’s cheek with potato gratin, Borettane onions and cashews. Every fatty and tender meat cut should come with Borettane onions. A simple but very solid Tarte Tarine capped a memorable meal.

Mercato di Sant’Ambrogio

You will see Mercato Centrale recommended in every guide book and Florence FB group, rightfully so. But it took me all those years to realize that Mercato di Sant’Ambrogio, the locals choice is the real deal. They are only a 20 minute walk apart. We tried mainly some fruits, bread, cheese and salami, and one particular salami stood out. Good, spicy salami is my weakness. At a vendor right off the middle western entrance, the Salame Spagnolo had that “come to papa” color, and the flavor had just the right balance.

In Florence, being the outdoor museum that it is, I opted not to brave the crowds at museums and churches this time. But it would feel like an incomplete trip without another visit to Abbazia di San Miniato al Monte. The atmosphere surrounding it, views off and of it, the cemetery, simply mesmerizing. Still feels like a secret considering the lack of crowds. You can find them all in Piazzale Michelangelo down the road. A more pleasant visit to the area would involve taking a taxi or bus to Miniato, walk down to the Piazzale, and down through the gardens toward the river for numerous selfie opps.

Even with only 48 hours, I could not leave Bistecca city without having the Bistecca. To me its like going to Mexico City and not having a taco. But with some of the old faves like Sostanza closed on Sundays, picking the right place was a challenge. I’m a serial researcher when it comes to food, but picking a good Bistecca in Florence is almost like throwing darts at a map. It dominates almost every review page to the point that none of the restaurants in Florence can afford to offer a bad cut, or not have it available. I cant think of any other city in the world with a similar situation. Segovia and its famous suckling pig comes close, but not quite.

I ended up picking Parione, and as expected turned out to be just what the gastro doc ordered. Its touristy alright, but you get a sense that just enough locals frequent it. The eggs with truffles didnt quite do it for me. The Picci did. The Bistecca while bluer than I remember did not taste like it needed to be cooked more. Supremely flavorful, buttery, slightly funky with just the right seasoning. If you havent perfected the Bistecca art at this point, you would have been in serious trouble. The one mystery here however was the total lack of seasoning on the beans. Did the old Pisa salt tax ban tradition extend to beans as well?

Nugolo
Da Ruggero
Categories: Florence, Italy | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Milu – The New Age of NYC Fast Food

One block away from Milu, in Madison Square Park, you will find the original Shake Shack. Twenty years ago, Shake Shack transitioned from a hot dog cart to a kiosk selling burgers and shakes. And before you knew it, FOMO and long lines started to disrupt the local squirrel population. Today Shake Shack has 360 locations worldwide, including one 5 minutes away from my house. The chicken sandwich ranks up there, and the Smoke Shack, featuring the signature quality beef with applewood-smoked bacon, cherry peppers, and Shack Sauce is perhaps the finest fast food burger we have today.

But while Shake Shack revolutionized America’s burger culture, the original shack neighbor Milu may be in the early innings of reinventing American fast food as we know it. Its a tough task considering our obsession with the familiar. But if anyone can do it, its probably fine dining veterans and students of taste, Milu’s co-founders. The trio has an extensive combined resume, including stints at another famous neighbor, Eleven Madison Park.

We essentially have an Eleven Madison Park and Shake Sack love child. I dont have the slightest idea if the co-founders have any ambitions beyond this, although by all indication ambition isnt exactly lacking here. To open a Chinese fast food operation that is far from traditional Chinese food, and far from traditional fast food in an ultra competitive environment requires some major chutzpah. Even if they dont open another location, I’m rooting for these guys as there’s nothing quite like Milu out there.

Thats not to say you should expect big flavors that are in line with finer dining, and you can cancel your ressies at nearby Upland. Thats to say for $10-15 you can get a well crafted bowl of expertly cooked protein, rice and greens, usually Watercrest salad, or cucumber salad. Some may balk at the amount of protein, and abundance of veggies, but thats part of the idea. Make it tasty, cheap, and healthy(er). Another big benefit is the space. Fast food often involves rubbing elbows, noise, long lines, and pretending that you are comfortable eating in the park while telling every other stranger that the Hoisin sauce was on your shirt before. At Milu its as comfortable as it gets. Although at peak lunch time you may experience a full house, and a line.

After trying about half of the bowls, I settled on the Chili Crisp Chicken. Its not terribly spicy, and it helps to be familiar with Sichuan sodium levels. The Sichuan Cauliflower with the Seaweed salad is outstanding as well, and so is the Brisket. They used to offer a Sichuan fried chicken on Saturdays that was plenty hot, and ultra, dentist approved crispy, but I’m not sure if that’s still the case. You also have access to free water, a big indication that they value comfort/needs over $$$.

On occasion you do get a taste of Milu’s growing pains. Last time, my Mandarin Duck’s crispy skin was far from it, and while the meat was tender alright, there wasnt much of it underneath the skin. The terrific marinated cucumbers, and duck fat rice however helped curb the disappointment. Even at well oiled machine Shake Shack, you can get a bad burger sometimes.

But there’s more. Milu also offer products that will upgrade your pantry in a meaningful way. Chili oils, Soy, Hoisin, their own seasoning, and dumpling sauces. I probably purchased around half of them and pour their seasoning on just about everything I cook. Although they make their own Chili Crisp, perhaps the most notable (and expensive) item they sell is the Fly By Jing Chili Crisp. The added Umami with this Chili Crisp will transform your eggs and pastas into something as complex as figuring out Bronski Beat lyrics. I’m still trying after all those years.

Categories: Gramercy, Flatiron, New York City | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Iceland – 10 Day Ring Road Itinerary

Much of this is a copy and paste (including her wonderful emojis) of what Mrs Z posted on her Facebook travel group. This trip was done in mid August in almost perfect weather. Watch road conditions if you attempt this at other times. 10 days is the minimum to do this. If you only have 9 days, skip Snæfellsnes, but thats not to say its skippable.

Day 1 – Blue Lagoon and Reykjavik

Blue Lagoon. Allow a couple of hours.

Explore Reykjavik. Main streets, Sun Voyager, Harpa Concert Hall, hot dog at Bæjarins Beztu Pylsur

Lunch at Cafe Loki – Try to sit upstairs, traditional plate (no fermented shark for us. Stinky food not my jam, and I havent found a single soul that liked it), Lamb Shank soup, smoked trout, Rye Bread Ice cream (yes!!!)

Dinner at Skal! – Inside Iceland’s first Food hall – sunchokes, skirt steak, arctic char. Excellent!

Perlan Museum

Stay at Reykjavik Residence Apartment. Recommend!

Day 2 – Snæfellsnes Peninsula

Geirabakarí Kaffihús – Good midway point stop. Bakery was the location of “Papa Johns” in ”The secret life of Walter Mitty”.

Kirkjufellsfoss – GOT sight, highlight

https://www.heyiceland.is/blog/nanar/5222/epic-iceland-itinerary-game-of-thrones-filming-locations

Lunch at Gilbakki – fish soup 😋, date pesto on a bagel. Fantastic lunch in the lone restaurant in Hellissandur where you can find some interesting murals. Like a mini Wynwood (Miami)

Djúpalónssandur beach – Very cool, atmospheric black beach

Lóndrangar – short stop, dramatic cliff views

Hellnar – nice little walk toward Arnastapi, and a good stop for coffee break with a view

Arnarstapi – Bárður, Gatklettur

The story of Bárður Snæfellsás the area first settler – https://guidetoiceland.is/connect-with-locals/regina/bardur-snaefellsas-the-mysterious-protector-of-the-snaefellsnes-peninsula

Rauðfeldsgjá Gorge – This was a fail for us. We walked inside the Gorge until reaching a dead end too soon (large boulder), need waterproof shoes

Búðakirkja – Black Church – The Motif #1 of Iceland. The most photographed structure. Dark skies actually help in this case

Bjarnarfoss waterfall – Cool, relatively unknown waterfall. Short hike to the bridge

Ytri Tunga – Beach where you may find seals, and whale skeleton

Buffet Dinner and stay at Langaholt Guesthouse. Fine stay, nice setting. There’s not much else in the area

Day 3 – Drive to Husavik

Grábrók crater – The largest of three volcanic craters, mostly covered in moss. It stands 170 m/550 feet tall. The last eruption was around 3400 years ago. Can be windy 👍. Beautiful views from the top. Bathroom at the restaurant in the gas station just prior. You just need to buy something. And by something, I mean more chips 

Kolugljúfur Canyon – Another cool stop on the way. As nice as the waterfall is, the canyon is the highlight. Walk down under the bridge, but can be slippery 👍👍. Unpaved road to get to the site

Sjávarborg Restaurant – Backtracking 10 km or so, but worth it. Seafood soup, fish of the day ❤️❤️

Glaumbær Farm & Museum (cool cafe inside that looks like a tea parlor ) 👍

Akureyri – Second largest city, cute downtown, good hot dog, ice cream stop. Park by the church

Goðafoss – Goðafoss got its name when Christianity was declared the official religion of Iceland, so the locals threw Norse pagan gods statues into the waterfall. Park and do the east side, by N1 gas station ❤️❤️

Dinner at Naustið – Mussels, fish and chips, Arctic char. Good, but second night better

Stay at Fosshotel Húsavík (2 nights)

Day 4 – Myvatn

Dettifoss – Take the paved 862 to the west lot, largest and strongest waterfall in Europe, Another 15 minutes walk against the flow to Selfoss – allow 1-1&1/2 hours total here

Hverir – Very cool Geothermal area. Nice setting. 👍

Grjótagjá – Quick cave stop. This is where Jon Snow and Ygritte had their romantic rendezvous 🤔

Lunch at Vogafjós Farm Resort – Good Burger! 👍

Hverfjall – 20 min steep hike to crater of a 2500 y/o volcano

Lava field Dimmuborgir – Volcanic rock formations – if time allows

Skútaís – Farm Ice Cream 👍

Skútustaðagígar – a park of pseudo craters, much more appreciated with a drone, but pleasant walk. If time and black midge flies allow. Myvatn afterall is named after the midge flies

Geosea in Húsavík – Geothermal Sea Baths – Try to go at sunset if its a nice day

Dinner at Naustið – Second meal. Fish of the day, fish soup. This is the strength of this place. Reserve in advance.

Day 5 – Northeast

Beitarhúsið – Nice middle of nowhere pit stop for coffee, lunch or whatever. Try the love balls

Stuðlagil Canyon – One of the highlights of the entire trip. Park at the second lot, a mile or so after crossing the bridge, very bumpy ride especially the last mile. Parkplatz Klaustrusel – Stuðlagil on Google. 3&1/2 mile round trip hike. Allow 2-3 hours. 

Seydisfjordur – Beautiful drive down to this Picturesque town. Check out the blue church, Fish n chips lunch at Fancy Sheep food truck. 👍

Gufu waterfall on the way back. Short stop

Litlanesfoss, Hengifoss – Steep hike, about 2 hours total (3.6 mile round trip). Unique fall, but not a must. Litlanesfoss halfway just as impressive. Looking back we probably should have relaxed at the hotel spa, or a town pool.

Dinner and stay at Gistihusid in Egilsstaðir

Day 6 – East

Drive toward Höfn on road 1 (against Google advice). Numerous short stops on the way:

Petra’s Stone Collection – very cute 👍

Nykurhylsfoss

Barkináfoss

Lækjavik

Hvalnes Lighthouse – stop if not cloudy or foggy

Red chair – Yes, its just a red chair on a rock

Hofn – Langoustine lunch in Pakkhús 😋 – skyr cake 😋😋

Diamond Beach – Park at the west side.  Waves can sneak up.💎💎💎

Múlagljúfur Canyon – Better light in the morning but tomorrow is busy, turn at 63.9886667, -16.3971589, 1.5km rough road to the parking lot, 30-45 minute walk to the viewpoint. We tried but elected to skip due to weather, but this seems like a relatively undiscovered gem

Dinner and stay at Fosshotel Glacier Lagoon – go to sauna and hot tub. Get the steak tartare, huge dishes

Day 7 – Glacier lagoon, drive to Vik

Jökulsárlón Zodiak tour 9:30. Arrive by 9 👍

Fjallsárlón Glacier Parking – Walk to observation area to see glacier up close

Hofskirkja church – turf covered roof and unique cemetery. The last turf church built and one a few remaining 

Svartifoss –  “the black waterfall”, the basalt columns inspired the design of Hallgrímskirkja church in Reykjavík. parking 700 ISK, 90 min round trip. 

Lunch at Kjarr Restaurant – cute location w waterfall view on some days, nice pastas especially the seafood

Fjaðrárgljúfur Canyon – Allow an hour. Walk till the metal deck 👍👍

Dinner at Black Crust Pizzeria  – liked the pizza but not the smell of clothes after. 

Reynisfjara Beach – black sand and puffins in season

Stay at Hotel Vik

Day 8 – South

Explore Vik’s other side:

        Reynisfjara beach – Columns and black sand beach and caves. Be careful of sneaker waves

        Dyrhólaey – lighthouse and dramatic black beach views 

Skógafoss – Try to come before 10 to beat the tour groups, go up the stairs and hike waterfall alley for at least one mile or at least until Fremri-Fellsfoss. Allow 2 hours. Best hike of the trip 

Lunch at Mia’s Country Van – Fish & Chips 

Kvernufoss – park at Skogar museum, 10 minute walk to the falls, waterproof clothes if you opt to go behind the fall. Rainbow if sunny 

Seljalandsfoss – go behind the waterfall, will get wet, slippery – wear waterproof gear

Gljufrabui – 5 minute walk from Seljalandsfoss (go left), hop on wet stones to go through canyon in water to get to waterfall

Secret Lagoon 👍

Dinner at Messinn Selfossi – Very popular with locals, but disappointing overall. I think we just ordered the wrong dishes for us (wolffish lacking in texture). Reserve if you go.

Stay at Hótel Kvika (2 nights) – Budget hotel but comfortable

Day 9 – Landmannalaugar

Landmannalaugar Hiking Tour with Arctic Adventured – Pickup at 8:15 from Selfoss N1 Gas Station 👍👍👍 ( take sandwiches and snacks with you ). Long day, a lot of driving but highly recommend

Dinner at Fjöruborðið Restaurant ❤️

Day 10 – The leftovers

Gullfoss

Strokkur

Þingvellir National Park

Fly home

Important tips

Categories: Iceland | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Eating With Safta, in Denver

Eater

How do you lose ownership of your namesake restaurant. It happened to Alon Shaya in New Orleans. Shaya, the restaurant was considered by some, the best new restaurant in America in 2015, and Shaya the chef joined the A list of the American culinary world as a result. I still needed some convincing because the last thing I wanted to eat in NOLA was Israeli food. The second last thing happened to be pizza, which meant skipping Shaya’s other place, Domenica after many visits to NOLA. Both, as part of the Besh Restaurant Group at that time, seemed like slam dunks, but for New Yorkers its like eating Indian food in Bologna.

Everything was going smoothly for Alon Shaya, arguably the most successful Israeli chef in the USA today. The Michael Solomonov of the south if you will. Then the Me Too movement happened which shook the food industry. 25 women filed complaints against partner John Besh, and Shaya tried hard to disassociate himself from the group. Shaya wasn’t successful at keeping his namesake, but was able to replace it with two Israeli standouts, Saba (grandpa) in New Orleans, and Safta (grandma) in Denver.

At both Safta and Saba, women play a key role. Shaya gives homage to Israeli grandparents that brought influences from Middle East, Europe and North Africa. EatWithSaba and EatWithSafta are the social media handles and websites (hence the title), even though you are surrounded by the usual under 30 crowd, and there’s no gefilte fish in sight. Shaya is back on track. Right? Well, there are some groups out there pushing to rename “father”, “mother” into something more inclusive. “Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in!”

Talking about inclusive, coincidentally there’s a growing movement in Denver called “Judaism Your Way” which is pretty much what the name suggests. A do whatever the f#%k you want Jewish community that is reimagined, inclusive, and beyond reformed really. Instead of Bar or Bat Mitsvah, they offer a gender inclusive Be Mitzvah. You want to end your Yom Kippur fast at noon, no worries, we even offer water if needed at the services. Heck bring a Porchetta sandwich if you absolutely need. But since “exclusive” is not part of their dictionary, this is not the type that would cancel grandma.

“Here’s an idea, Ziggy. Maybe stick to food?”. Ok Ok! Safta’s strength is well documented, and in fact written all over the entrance in huge letters. “Pita + Hummus”. The pita and hummus is straight out of the Michael Solomonov (Zahav/Dizengoff) Israeli food for dummies playbook. Or is it the other way around. The pita here is a little crispier (perhaps reheated) but just as good as what you get in Philly. The hummus with lamb ragu was like a Hava Nagila in your mouth – the wedding version. Though much of the flavor came from the well crafted ragu.

You can even add “+ Falafel” to the wall. Golden crispy exterior, and creamier than your usual green interior. The Salatim (small, mezze like salads) is another thing from the Solomonov playbook, and every single one we tried was spot on. The Lutenitsa especially stood out, but I wouldnt skip the smoky Baba and the peppery Muhammara. You can have a satisfying meal with simply the dishes I mentioned so far.

Sometimes, when everything goes well in a highly acclaimed place, your get on a food high. Thats when any faults that follow become unnoticed, forgivable, or become apparent later. While the lamb shank’s flavor was spot on, the meat was a bit dry. For $44 thats a no-no. The duck confit tagine was fine, but again, on the dry side, and wont win any Tagine competitions. Harissa chicken was probably the best main, though not particularly exciting to New Yorkers, including in the looks dep’t. If you order more than one main, might as well add the Persian rice that can compliment just about all.

Desserts did not produce anything noteworthy. Although the lone dessert we didnt try, the Knafeh, may very well be the one to get. We just eat plenty of Knafeh back at home. The space is attractive, comfortable, and the drinks were well balanced. Safta is a solid B. And while the execution of the mains can use some work, I can see myself becoming a regular if I lived in Denver

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5 Gems in Salento

In Baseball, you bring the all dependable closer to finish the game. It doesnt have to be necessarily the best player, but one with just the right skill set for the job. Similarly, in travel, you often find just the right place to add to the itinerary, that seals the deal. It doesnt have to be the highlight, but one that checks the rest of the boxes. Salento is the Mariano Rivera of the travel closers. The plush white towns of Valle d’Itria, and the atmospheric Matera will make you want more. While the spectacular Salento coastline, and Florence of the south, Lecce, will finish the job.

There’s only one little problem with Salento. Its not exactly know for its food. The Florence of the south thing, has nothing to do Bisteccas. But the heel of the boot is not exactly lacking in quality ingredients. You got some of the finest tomatoes in the world, fantastic seafood, top tier olive oil, and splendid local Cheese you’ll find everywhere. But for some reason, its not known for a wealth of great dining destination, at least compared to the rest of the country. Maybe its a misnomer, or entirely wrong conclusion on my part. Either way, have no worries folks. Uncle Z is here to help. Here are five places that may perk your interest.

Trattoria La Puritate (Gallipoli) – Trattoria la pure joy. As beautiful as Gallipoli is, to me this is one of the reasons to visit. The famous Gallipoli shrimp baked in salt, and plated table side was unlike any shrimp dish I ever tasted. Stellar pastas like Linguine with shrimp, with fish and turmeric, or with Bonito. You cant go wrong with either of the three, or a fresher than fresh simply grilled Amberjack. Puritate is a bit old school, but comfortable and inviting. One of the most memorable meals of the entire trip.

SoFish (Otranto) – I’ve already written about this gem in the Otranto post. As the name implies SoFish is a hip, “Fast Casual” joint specializing in quick seafood. Note “Quick” in Italy is roughly an hour. It appears that this is a relatively new fast spreading concept, started by the great success of Pescaria in Polignano a Mare. Although more of a restaurant this is a sound alternative to your usual bready quickies.

The menu features a nice selection of seafood sandwiches, salads and excellent craft beer (Reminder: Italian craft beer is most underrated in the world). While everything we tried was good, the lobster roll is worth a dedicated blog post. Its one of the most outrageous Lobster Rolls I ever had. Pricy (for Puglia) but once you get it you see why. More like a well crafted lobster salad with huge chunks of meaty lobster and the rest of the lobster resting on top.

400 Gradi (Lecce) – Highly acclaimed Neapolitan, and arguably the finest pizza in Puglia. According to this well regarded list, one of the best in the world. Delicious, perfectly chewy crust, with top notch, zero km ingredients. And I suppose I reached the pivotal point in my life where I had to try pizza shaped like a star and the one here, with Ricotta filled sun rays didn’t disappoint. Its a bit outside the closest old city gate, and quite popular with the locals. So come as soon as they open or be prepared to wait.

Ristorante Blu Notte (Lecce) – If I have to pick one must on this list, this is the one. In fact I started writing a dedicated post on this one, before I quickly realized I dont have enough pictures and material for a full story. Its a relatively unknown place that I havent seen mentioned anywhere. We come from NYC where much of the seafood is imported, and so we go abroad with a certain appetite, sometimes even in areas not known for seafood (eg Bologna). Blu Notte satisfied the urge and then some.

But the best part is that we stumbled upon it by pure luck after two other places I marked were closed during lunch, and the skies were getting angrier. We watched the old streets of Lecce practically get flooded within minutes. The house antipasti alone here is worth the “price of admission”. A dozen or so land, sea, and street food delights. But the pastas weren’t too shabby either, especially the outstanding Seppia with shrimp. Fantastic homemade desserts and really a flawless meal from start to finish.

Pasticceria Andrea Ascalone (Galatina) – In Lecce and much of Salento you’ll see these pastries called Pasticciotto everywhere. You’ll find them in every bakery, B&B, and featured in every food tour. Eat them at your own risk, since once you’ll try them at this Pasticceria where they were invented, every other Pasticciotto will taste pedestrian. Tour buses including week long food tours make the pilgrimage to this place. Smart to build an impressive 15th century Basilica nearby, with some of the most stunning frescoes you’ll find anywhere.

Categories: Italy, Puglia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

This is Polignano a Mare

Volare, oh-oh. Cantare, oh-oh-oh-oh. Everybody!

When you stroll the winding streets of Polignano a Mare in Puglia, one of the first things you’ll notice is that everyone is humming the same song. Everyone except the locals that is. They still wont forget that Volare singer Domenico Modungo who left Polignano a Mare as a child never mentioned the city much as an adult. Maybe the reason the residents turned his statue around to face them, instead of the sea, was to throw produce at him on occasion. They probably do it with Calabrian tomatoes as they are very proud of their own. My youngest will be the first to tell you that we couldn’t get enough of Puglia tomatoes.

Nel blu dipinto di blu. I wish there was a way to embed videos here. Wait… Googling… looks like not only there is, but I’ve done it before.

Volare means to fly. And Polignano a Mare, with its limestone cliffs, and majestic balcony views will make you wish you could. You can see what inspired Modungo within minutes of your arrival. Just 30 minutes from Bari, and a short drive from Monopoli, another stunner, Polignano is one of Puglia’s biggest gems. Its not exactly a secret in Europe these days. But in the US, pretty much anything outside the Rome-Florence-Venice express is fairly unknown. Polignano a Mare is exhibit 1-A why it makes sense to veer off the route, or come back to see the rest.

You can start your flying lessons by diving from those cliffs as many do. Polignano after all is home to the Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series. For American readers, this World Series involves athletes and teams from all over the world. A curious concept. The beaches here are rocky, but the water is crazy inviting. We opted for a swim in one of the many caves off a boat.

I’m not necessarily advocating to stay here for a few days. I havent done it so I dont know what its like. But Polignano is as touristy as they come, for good reason. Exploring it on one day, and from the water on another, would compliment your Puglia adventure nicely. Doing both on the same day is a tough task, especially if you want to include a nice seafood fest at the excellent Antiche Mura. Or if you are strictly after a setting like no other with no budget in mind, you got the famed Grotta Palazzese and its cave restaurant.

You will also want to spend some time in San Vito, where most of the boats take off. Easy to get there with a car or a short Tuk Tuk taxi from Polignano. The San Vito Monastery, beach and picturesque port will make you stick around a bit, while waiting for a Dorino boat. Seeing the cliffs, the mesmerizing caves, and swimming within one is an experience you wont quickly forget. The slightly X rated Dorino stories can only add to the experience. This is a great way to see Poligano a Mare from the water

San Vito

You can easily get lost in the old town, but keep going until you reach yet another terrace. You will take the same pictures again and again, and be thankful for all those photography classes you took. I didnt as you can see. Your best bet is to stop reading immediately, and look at Google. In my defense, I didnt know I will resume blogging when we visited Puglia. In my defense when I used to blog, shaky hands, excessive drinking.

After lunch at Antiche Mura, you may want to visit Super Mago del Gelo Mario Campanella, or Super Mario in short. Skip the hyped ice cream in favor of the specialty coffee with lemon and Amaro. Turns out we’ve been drinking coffee wrong for centuries.

Another tip: Combine Monopoli and the boat tour from San Vito on one day, and spend a day in Polignano on another, for a more leisurely visit to the coast. Or consider staying in Monopoli for a few days, especially if you are not driving. Not only more subdued, but positioned well for day trips, and beaches.

In closing I should mention that my thoughts are with the residents of Fort Myers and area. Although we lived through Sandy, and even lived in South Florida briefly, I cant even begin to imagine what they are going through. Its really tough to watch, and scary that Ian is regaining strength and about to strike again. In the small chance you are reading this from Ian’s path, I hope you stay safe.

Categories: Italy, Puglia | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Upland – Make American Great Again

Notice the all important extra letter. This is not a political post. Quite the opposite actually. Its a celebration of our great uniter, American cuisine. Whatever that means. Since USA is relatively young compared to the rest of the world, its a bit complicated to define, even though you have enough examples of it (burgers, pastrami, bagels…). The label is often used more as a default when you cant call it anything else, except Italian in some cases. But we often categorize restaurants simply based on the origin of the owner/chef, as is the case with Upland.

Upland menu is as American or Italian as it gets in NYC, but it bills itself as Californian. Chef Justin Smillie who since left to Il Buco Alimentari e Vineria, named it after his hometown in California. Maybe its my software engineering background, as I like things to be orderly for search purposes among other reasons in this case, but is it really necessary to break down the American tag into states? I can only imagine the poor Google or Yelp engineers trying to figure out the impact of adding a new category or subcategory. Upland is the only restaurant in NYC currently labeled as such. Does the signature burger, a creative riff on In-N-Out has something to do with it? Is it the grilled peaches?

Perhaps its the seasonality. Though we do have a label for upmarket seasonal American: “New American”. An Italian visiting NYC for the first time, will feel more at home at the pizza and pasta dominated Upland than a Californian. Sometimes restaurateurs try to be cute, and differentiate themselves in a crowded field, but more often than not, its best to keep it simple. Be bold, but be proud. Its American. This is not a rant by the way, but an observation. Its a celebration, remember?

Upland is a bright star in the Philly based Starr group’s huge portfolio that includes names like Buddakan, Pastis, and of course, the shiniest of the stars, Jackass Burrito. Upland got everything going for it. A prime Flatiron location. A deep American and Italian greatest hits menu. A striking, high ceiling, trendy looking space. And unlike many of its peers, it survived the pandemic. Its the type of place you can bring a date, new coworker, or host a 70th birthday celebration. On a recent visit, we witnessed suits, and gym attire.

Whether you come for Brunch, lunch or dinner you will face a very full menu. Though for some reason the much hyped Burger is not available for dinner. The Pizza is exactly what you’d expect from a place like this, except in the case of Breakfast pizza at least you get double the listed ingredients. In addition to bacon, cheddar, egg you get Broccoli, Sausage, Onions and more. It worked just fine for us, but could be misleading for others.

The Shakshuka-like “Eggs in Hell” had a nice flavor but missing something like sausages, or potatoes. The reason that shakshuka works on its own is that you usually get a nice fluffy pita and the eggs are more prevalent. While a dining companion was not looking I borrowed one of her breakfast sausages that made a big difference. Desperate times, desperate measures. This is the only miss from the two recent visits.

In some ways Upland reminds me of Via Carota. A jack of all trades, master of all. Solid pizzas, solid pastas, solid everything else. I couldnt fault anything with the Pappardelle with spicy sausages. And the Bucatini Cacio e Pepe were the best I’ve had in NYC since, well, Via Carota. Maybe even better since not quite as salty.

There are very few starters as satisfying as a nice Stracciatella with honey and grilled peaches. The combination here works so well, making the added Shishito peppers (both turned out spicy) unnecessary. The Duck Wings is a trend setter. I started seeing them more and more since Upland opened. The skin is crispy, well seasoned, while the dark flesh easily falls apart. You know its good as soon as you start operating.

But the best dish on the menu might be surprisingly the cod, and that may not have anything to do with the cod. The flaky fish, while mildly discolored, is expertly cooked. But the mixture of Fregula (Californian for Israeli Couscous), calamari and bits of chorizo really elevate the dish.

Extra brownie points for serving delicious fluffy bread with butter without charge. Refreshing to see these days. Solid drinks, nice atmosphere. In super competitive Flatiron, Upland is still a solid choice for American (with subtle Idaho hints). Its a Go!

Upland
345 Park Ave S (26th), Flatiron
Recommended Dishes: Pappardelle, Bucatini Cacio e Pepe, Duck Wings, Stracciatella, Cod, Budino

Categories: Gramercy, Flatiron, New York City | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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