Author Archives: Ziggy

Kish Kash – The Village Couscouseria

Kish Kash - ChraimeWhen is a concept, not really a concept.  Or doesnt feel like one.  If you walk inside Kish Kash in West Village without knowing anything about it, it may feel like just another casual restaurant serving food that my be even too familiar.  But once you read about it you can see that this is not your ordinary kitchen.  Its the only place in NYC that makes couscous the way it was made 300 years ago.  Couscous made with a lot of love that accumulated over the years by chef Einat Admony (Balaboosta, Taim).

Couscous is the side dish most used in my house because its the easiest to make.  Kish Kash refers to the Sieve traditionally used to make Couscous by hand, a process that takes hours.  As far as I know, Admony is the only one doing it in NYC.  They dont even do this in Morocco anymore.

But what is the real concept here for the average eater who most likely wont notice the difference.  While its definitely a fluffier, better tasting product, once combined with the terrific Mafrum (spiced ground beef meat balls with tomato sauce) or any of the other items on the menu, the flavor gap narrows and it may taste like any other couscous after a few bites.

Kish Kash

The real concept to me is the place and the rest of the menu.  A well designed bright, inviting space serving quick, homey Israeli/North African dishes like the mentioned Mafrum which might be the thing to get.  Or the Chraime, a whitefish, Branzino in this case, topped with tangy tomato sauce.  All dishes come with the house Couscous of course and homemade Harissa you can add once you get bored.  That combination, whether with meat or fish, results in a very satisfying forkful.

While I would still opt for this couscous given the option, the dishes would work with instant couscous or maybe even with something else.  You can make the meal as quick or long as you want.  There are starters like the legit looking hummus.  And since you are at an Admony house, by law you must try the cauliflower that comes ladened with Tahini, pines nuts, and raisins.  There’s Israeli wine and beer of course, but no Malt “Black Beer” for those truly missing Tel Aviv.

Kish Kash
455 Hudson St (Barrow/Morton), West Village
Rating: 2 Z’s (out of 4)
Stars range from Good to Exceptional. Simple as that.
Recommended Dishes: Mafrum, Chraime, Cauliflower

Kish Kash Cauliflower

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Categories: New York City, West Village | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Jeju’s Six Courser May be the Best Deal in Town

Ok, so now that I got your attention I will tell you the truth.  Jeju Noodle Bar’s deal is most likely not the best deal in town.  Not even close.  There’s a guy in Sunset park’s Chinatown that makes delicious steamed rice noodles for a buck fifty.  You can get an entire meal at the new Momofuku Bang Bar for less then six.  There’s a 2-for-1 groin massage plus flu shot special every other Friday in Brighton Beach.  Its New York City.  There are hundreds of great deals out there.

But Jeju’s Six Courser is unlike anything I’ve had in NYC, and something I would like to repeat.  Like very soon.  The set menu was introduced about three months ago, just in time for me to rediscover this gem in West Village.  the set menu is unconventional and the perfect fit for our sharing style.  Instead of being your average tasting menu that features small dishes, some not on the menu, it showcases the menu highlights at a lower price when combined.  It costs $45 per person.

Jeju Noodle Bar

Jeju Noodle Bar

Jeju is like the Cote (Korean BBQ) of Korean noodle joints.  I’m sure many balk at the idea of a Ramen like noodle bar in a fancier environment, but the concept is not much different than that of a Momofuku Noodle Bar.  At the helm is a man with an impressive resume.  If we would play Fantasy Michelin Stars (and we should) he would have been a first round pick.  Its almost like Jeju’s brand new Michelin star is an afterthought at this point.  But the recent change to get rid of reservations altogether made Jeju more approachable (are you reading Missy Robbins?).   The current set menu:

Roasted Mushrooms – The best compliment I can give to a mushroom dish is that Mrs Z, a Mushroom hater, coming from a long line of mushroom haters, ate and liked this.

Jeju Noodle Bar - Mushrooms

Jeju Chicken Wings – Simple yet your typical (in a good way) expensive light battered fried chicken with a dip you want to dip your car keys in.  But you cant.  Because its keyless entry now.

Jeju Noodle Bar - Chicken

Toro Ssam Bap – This was incredible.  Layers of fatty tuna, scrambled eggs and Tobiko (fish roe) rice.  Nori on the side to help you make the sickest spicy tuna rolls you’ll ever have.

Jeju Noodle Bar - Tuna

Prime Ribeye Ssam – Anything over 4 courses in NYC usually means a “tasting menu” where the meat course consists of a few slices of high end beef.  Here you have 12 oz of perfectly cooked sliced ribeye (they dont ask you how you want it cooked – a good thing).  You can eat it as is or dip in their own nutty Romesco sauce which they should bottle and give away as party favors at the end of the night.  It should go well with scrambled eggs.

Jeju Noodle Bar - Rib EyeGochu Ramyun – There are so many Ramen variations in the city that its hard to understand the difference between Korean Ramyun and Japanese Ramen.  This pork broth carried some serious depth, and is essentially like the best Tonkotsu you will ever eat.

Jeju Noodle Bar - Ramyun

Dessert Course – Your choice of Ice cream or Sorbet.  We had both, like together at some point.  While forgettable compared to the rest of the meal, this was a solid finisher.  This is a GO!

Jeju Noodle Bar
679 Greenwich St (Christopher), West Village
Rating: 2.5 Z’s (out of 4)
Stars range from Good to Exceptional. Simple as that.
Recommended Dishes: 6 course menu

Categories: New York City, West Village | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Hot Space – Big Fish, Bigger Fish

Hot Space FishApologies for the blurry photo.  I start to shake in front of deliciousness.  My posts will be smaller and to the point beginning… well it began actually.  Too much going on in my life at the moment, so I dont have as much time to blog these days.  But this is actually a good, refreshing change that will allow me to write about more places.  More places, more usefulness, less mambo jumbo, same grammar.

Hot Space is a Chinese Restaurant in Brooklyn’s Sunset Park Chinatown.  Its unfortunately not on 8th ave so it may need my help.  The number eight is the Chinese lucky number because in Mandarin eight sounds like the word wealth.  The meaning is one of the main driving forces behind the creation of the now largest Chinatown in NYC.  Popular 90’s rumor was to take the N train to the “Sky Stop” (when the train comes up) and you will find success on 8th avenue.

This makes it easy to incorporate the number into the business name.  Lucky 8, Great 8, mister 8, and the brilliantly named Restaurant on 58th st, are some examples.  Although some of the ones without the number 8 can use some spelling luck like me.  “Wash and Flod Laundromat” – sounds daring and flat out dangerous

This is a one dish post really, but its a doozy.  A big tray of fish.  After the servers take your coats and puts them in a large plastic bag so the coats wont attract any of the smells that come with the dishes (I wish my in-laws would do the same), they explain the menu and how to “build” your big boy tray of fish.  You got your choices of fish – usually Sea Bass, Big Mouth Bass, Buffalo Bass, Idaho Bass, and anything and everything ending in Bass.  You add your choice of veggies, sauce, and spice level and off you wait.

And while you wait you stare at the giant screen for Chinese entertainment while your significant other is not looking. The entire scene matches that of this particular Chinatown.  Like stepping into another country.  It helps when you are the only Caucasians in the entire room.  You also have instructions on the table on how to handle the fish once it arrives, like “wait until it stops flapping before eating”.

The fish then arrives and it’s magnificent.  Its not that different looking than the huge trays you see in Fei Long Market’s food court.  Its understandably costlier – about $70 once you add all the ingredients, and it can easily feed 3.  I ordered the Sea Bass in a medium spiced garlicky sauce and it was the perfect amount of heat on a fish whose flavors just pop.  We also added grilled BBQ squid which was nice and cajuny but not really necessary.

Hot Space Squid

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EV Bites: The Hanukkah Edition

Tatsu RamenEV Bites is a monthly(ish) feature, showcasing 5 places in or around East Village you should know about.  I will occasionally extend the border to Nolita and LES, and maybe even mention a name more than once.  The East Village neighborhood, in case you’ve been living under a rock, or Staten Island is an incubator for top industry talent, and a goldmine of world cuisine.

Silky Kitchen – I cant keep up with all the new Chinese in the area.  The depth and the range of the different kinds of cuisines and types of establishments is overwhelming.  Silky is another Hunanese noodle quicky.  The dry noodle plates pack plenty of flavor, with the noodles being a tad too silky and soft for my taste, but still good.  The dish to get so far is the beef and Daikan dumplings.  Very close to dumpling Perfection.

Silky Kitchen Dumplings

Tatsu Ramen (top)- Its Ramen season here.  But when is it Ramen season in LA exactly?  Tatsu is an LA based Tonkotsu Ramen shop that operates like some shops in Tokyo.  Walk in, order your food and drinks (even if it means free water) from the iPad on the wall, slide your card, and bring the printed receipt to the host who will sit you.  On your table you are presented with all sorts of condiments including fresh garlic for your annual fresh garlic press.  My “Bold Ramen” wasnt quite bold but above average, not too rich porkiness.  The pork belly was sliced thin which I prefer, and the egg was a soft boiled whole which I also like.  Another great fast casual option on 1st

Vish – I mentioned Vish in a recent Hummus feature.  But after a few more visits its becoming more and more evident that this may be the best Hummus in the city.  Its not a question of whether they make Hummus daily but how many times each day.  The result is silky smooth, as creamy as it gets without being watery, with fantastic flavor to boot.

Vish Hummus

Vish

Martina – The super competitive environment in East Village sometimes produces mysterious results.  Places open with “success” written all over them, sometimes unexpectedly close or change.  Martina abandoned the Roman fast casual concept, and as of last week its a full service restaurant, inching a bit closer to big sister Marta.  While the concept is different, the value is pretty much the same.  The pizzas are more expensive, but two inch larger, the beans and the rest of the hits are still on the menu, and there are some new additions.

Hi-Collar – There are a few guarantees in the East Village.  Veselka and Cafe Mogador will be packed for Brunch.  You will find black Squirrels in Tompkins Park.  And Hi-Collar will have a line outside mid afternoon.  Its a Japanese coffeehouse by day, sake bar by night, owned by a guy (Bon Yagi) that owns quite a few establishments in “Little Japan” (East 9th, 10th).  Come for the Omurice (fluffy omelette over rice), stay for the Mentai Pasta – like the Japanese Cacio e pepe

Hi-Collar Mentai Pasta

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Hell’s Kitchen Guide – 2018 Update

TaladwatYou may have been wondering why I havent updated the Hell’s Kitchen Guide in a while.  Maybe I dont hang out there nearly as much anymore.  Or watch too much Daredevil?  One is true.  I still hang out there often, especially before or after the Hell’s Kitchen tour.  But I do watch Daredevil.  I even saw the Devil of Hell’s Kitchen himself in action, slurping on Ivan Ramen noodles in Gotham West Market. No joke.  I asked his buddy Luke Cage what they were up to and he said they were filming The Defenders.  Jessica Jones was eating elsewhere, obviously not a fan of the just updated Hell’s Kitchen Survival Guide.

But thanks to Daredevil, the neighborhood is much better and safer today.  You can walk around the kitchen after 8.  Thai joints continue to make babies, without protection and protection money concerns.  And there’s even a Momofuku now.  Two of them actually.  One of which, Bang Bar, which I wrote about last week, is in the guide.

Pure Thai Cookhouse is a well oiled machine that is perhaps the most important Thai among dozens in the area.  It was just a matter of time until the husband and wife team open Taladwat, dishing out small plates a few blocks down.  So far so delicious, and an obvious addition to the guide.  Another exciting addition is Saar Indian Bistro (below) from another master, Hemant Mathur, bridging Indian fine dining and typical curry houses ever so smoothly.  And about time I added Corner Slice at the constantly changing Gotham West Market.

I removed some dead skin and closings like Tehuitzingo and Larb Ubol which were the most shocking ones.  But on a more personal note, the closing of the neighborhoody Cafe Ole hurts the most.  I spent countless of hours there eating sandwiches and soups, while talking to Ana.  She will be missed.

The Hell’s Kitchen Survival Guide

 

 

Categories: Midtown West, New York City | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Momofuku’s Latest is a Bang for Your Buck

Bang BarI rarely stand on lines for food.  It took me four years to try the Cronut.  I happened to pass by Dominique Ansel one early morning and there it was.  A Cronut staring at me in the face, with no lines.  So I picked it off the ground, brushed it off, and took a few bites.  It was adequate!  In the city that never sleeps, where the food options can be exhausting, lines are usually for FOMO (fear of missing out) sufferers.  Perhaps if you are in the city for a short time, and you have your mind set on something, I get it.  But for the rest of us, its like going to the Statue of Liberty.  We have a lifetime of opportunities and endless possibilities.

But then there’s Momofuku.  Over the years, I’ve waited and sometimes even elbowed my way to Ssam Bar and Nishi.  And with the new Shawarma-esque Bang Bar opening at the Time Warner Center, a 40 minutes wait for a snack seemed very doable.  5 minutes answering email, 5 minutes on Trip Advisor forum, 20 minutes playing “Woody”, 10 minutes looking for new knife set (can knives be gifts to a spouse considering they can be used as a weapon?).  And before you know it, you are in the delivery waiting room, having a conversation with David Chang.  Ok, it was more like him saying “how is it going”, and me just staring at him.

This is not one of those posts where I woo you with food porn.  Instead I woo with… lines I suppose.  Simply leave it to Momofuku to make waiting fun.  The line is broken down into three sections.  Like a special exhibit in a museum, or in a way, a hospital delivery room

Bang Bar Meats

Eater

First section:  A roped line near, but not directly in front of the entrance.  Employees will chat with you, hand out menus, suggestions, knock knock jokes, and explain how the process works.  The anticipation builds partly because you cant see anything.  When time comes someone takes a small group to…

Second line:  The lucky few get to stand by the wall watching the action through the glass.  Anticipation continue to build, and so are second thoughts about what you want.

Third room:  You now enter a small open waiting room where you place your order and just hang out, talking to the staff or other patrons.  You may be given some freebies like rice pudding with kimchi stew, or a potato, mortadella casserole.  Both almost as delicious as the main event.

The Bang (bread) like a soft middle eastern Laffa filled and rolled with spicy gochujang marinated pork or chicken, along with the accompanied sauces and pickled veggies.  Looks like something you may get from a halal cart but undeniably Korean and delicious.  The pork was packed with enough heat and flavor so no sauces required.  But if you must you have the Ssam and the rest of them by the wall.  There are also two “Dips” that come with the bread like the herby eggplant which is more of a salad.  There are two communal tables.

But here’s the best part.  The price!  In this entire EWZ universe, I dare you to find a NYC post where I’ve said this.  But $5.79 for a Momofuku product in the high end Columbus Shops, is what you would expect to pay at a Halal cart.  Card only

Bang Bar Spicy Pork

Categories: Midtown West, New York City | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

What to Eat in Getaria {Basque}

Elkano TurbotWhat should you eat in a small fishing village where the specialty is Turbot?  You guessed it… Steak!  Its actually quite delicious in this part of Spain.  Same goes for the green Shishito-like peppers they call here Gernika, which can be seen on just about every menu.  But the story is similar to the one in Segovia.  People Pilgrimage (yes its a verb too) from all over for the world renowned holiness, the Turbot.  Heard of the Camino de Elkano?  Me neither.

But the town of Getaria happens to be a major stop in the UNESCO’d Camino de Santiago where 250,000 pass by annually.  I took a walk with Mrs Ziggy one morning where we briefly walked on the Camino path, and made an ill advised left turn, only to see some of the walkers following us making the same turn.  Oh no buddy, you need to go THAT way.  We are just chilling, picking on grapes.  Curious how many hikers give in to temptation, and stick around for a few days to eat and drink in this culinary wonderland.  Getaria is particularly unique.  I cant compare it to any other town we visited in Europe.  Here’s a little food guide to help you out.

Mayflower – This became the family fave after spending a week here.  The tables outside lining up under the umbrellas are some of the most sought after in town.  Reserve them in advance (for 8:30 or 10 seating).  Fresher than fresh fish cooked on a charcoal grill dominate here as in just about every other restaurant in town.  We indulged in Monkfish (Rape), Sea Bass, Hake (Merluzza), and even the Bonito which is like the best canned tuna you will ever eat.  Start with the green Gernika peppers, tomato salad and their terrific Pulpo Gallega (smokier and spicier than the usual Galician Octopus).  Wash it down with a local Txakoli of course.

 

Elkano – This is the reason why people take expensive taxi rides to Getaria.  Its considered one of the best restaurants in north Spain, and a whole fish (Turbot of course) eating experience like no other.  I asked the friendly owner what happens when they don’t have Turbot or run out of it.  He explained that they try to convey and market themselves as more of a complete seafood establishment that is not just about the Turbot.  A few minutes later you are presented with the Turbot, treated like the holy grail.  Later on, chocolates come on a plate shaped like Turbot, followed by the bill with a Turbot shaped magnet!  Ok?!?  The owner will explain the various parts of the fish, and the different textures and flavors resulting from them.  This is also a good place to try Kokotxas (fish cheeks).

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Kaia Kaipe – If the Elkano experience is a bit too rich for your blood, its baby sister may do just fine.  Like a nice cross between an Asador and fine(r) dining.  Popular with locals partly due to its inviting terrace.  A similar menu to Elkano where you can indulge in the Turbot among other local species.  And if you are finally ready for some meat in Turbotville, the Sirloin here is top notch.

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Giroa Taberna/Politena – Perhaps the two most frequented bars serving Pintxos and an assortment of simple large plates.  Politena seems the busier and more “Pintxos friendly” of the two

Araneta – A very lovely, simple looking Asador up on the mountains, very popular with locals.  About 20 minute drive from Getaria.  Here you can get a fantastic Ribeye, and an even better wild mushrooms with Foie and egg yolk.  When you have a group of mushroom haters (the rest of my family) wipe a mushroom plate clean you know you got something very special. On the drive back stop by at…

 

Txakoli Ameztoi – One of many Txakoli producers in the area.  Stop by at the very least for the amazing views off its parking lot (bottom)

El Astillero – The one that got away.  Tried to eat here on multiple occasions but it was either booked one night, closed on another, and “no terrace? Neh. Lets try again tomorrow” night.  Well, tomorrow never arrived.  Its a similar Asador to Mayflower, but the lack of a terrace did make a difference in this case.  I’m not one to usually choose restaurants based on their outdoor space but there was a clear difference between eating in and out here.  The terraces of Getaria should have their own Twitter account.

Mayflower

Mayflower Terrace

Gaintza – Another Txakoli producer and a 6 room hotel which served as our base for the week.  Sometimes accommodations dont quite work out as you fantasize, and sometimes you fantasize about your accommodations for days to come.  This was the latter.  We also took a tour and tasting of the winery.  Very interesting, informative and quite delicious (more Bonito please, and anchovies).  Loved waking up here every morning.

IMG_9239IMG_9128IMG_9299

Categories: Spain | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Five Gems in Brooklyn

Kashkar lagmanAs the great Manhattan rent squeeze continues, Brooklyn’s dining scene is getting more and more interesting.  Years ago, you would never hear of notable places opening in neighborhoods like Prospect Heights, Bed-Stuy, Stuyvesant Heights. or any neighborhood with Stuy in it.  Brooklyn is getting the same media coverage as Manhattan these days.  Couple that with the ethnic food wonderland in the less gentrified areas of Brooklyn.  Here are five very diverse spots I’ve been enjoying lately.  A small sample showcasing what Brooklyn is all about these days.

Hometown BBQ – If I have to pick one destination in Brooklyn, or a reason to leave Manhattan, Hometown is it.  I wasnt sold at first, but boy oh boy I am now.  This is pure, legendary, finger licking stuff.  The brisket is perhaps their pride and joy, but the spare ribs are second to none.  The Italian sausage with smoked provolone and peppers is awesome.  And while other BBQ joints treat chicken like second class citizens, here they marinade it with Oaxacan spices for two days, grill it over wood, and dress it with salsa verde.  The result is a juicy triumph.

Claro – The Gowanus area is not exactly the first neighborhood I think about when it comes to food in Brooklyn, but as I said above, things are changing all over.  Claro is where you go for authentic Oaxacan flavors.  Its small, almost always fully booked, but we manage to get seats at the bar even in the busiest times.  The menu is loaded with essentially enlarged taco-like stuff on dough (pretty sure “stuff on dough” is a foodie term).  Like the toasty Tostada-like Memelas which come either loaded with juicy pork rib or wild mushrooms.  And then you have the sensational Mole Negro, where you’ll be pulling that shortrib in subsequent dreams.Claro Sabina Memela

Kashkar Cafe –  Although the city of “Kashgar” is technically in China, it makes more sense for “Kashkar” to be in Russian Brighton Beach instead of a Chinatown.  I’ve written plenty about this Uyghur/Uzbek before, and I dont include places so out of the way on the Z-List unless I have a very good reason. Off the beaten path takes on a new meaning here, but I do hear more and more people speaking English inside, as its becoming more popular.  Try the Geiro Lagman (hand pulled noodles), Juvova dumplings, any of the kebabs, and Langsai salad along with their bread and you’ll see why its worth the schlep.Kashkar Cafe

Tacos Matamoros – If you think this pick makes this list look suddenly super random, you are correct.  Thats sort of the point.  And even though, there’s a Mexican place already mentioned on the list, they couldnt be more different.  In fact this what really highlights what Brooklyn is all about, and the difference today between the gentrified halves of the borough.  A meal here will cost you about 1/5 of the bill at Claro.  Although on my Brooklyn tour we concentrate on the Chinatown portion of Sunset Park, I’ve been spending some time at Matamoros as of late.  And while the tacos are good and cheap, I prefer just about everything else here, especially the Tamales, and egg dishes (Huevos Rancheros, Huevos con Chorizo)Tacos Matamoros- eggs and chorizo

Werkstatt – I’ve written plenty about this eclectic gem in… ok, I still dont know what neighborhood they are in..  Ditmas Park, Flatbush, Prospect Park South, NoDi (North of Ditmas Park which I totally just made up).  It doesnt matter.  It looks, feels and acts like a neighborhood gem, making a lot of area customers happy.  Its technically Austrian/German.  And while you cant go wrong with the fine pretzel, schnitzels, and goulash, there’s really no cuisine the owner/chef cant do.  Thai, Italian, Thai Italian.  I just look at the specials board and pick whatever sounds good.  On a recent visit I had a perfectly cooked Skate with brown butter and capers.

Other random gemsFOB Filipino, Lilia, Nargis Cafe, Popina, Olmsted, Sofreh, Ugly Baby, Hummus Market, Traif, Fei Long Supermarket food court

Werkstatt Pretzel

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El Molín de Mingo {Asturias} – Pitu Nation

El Molín de Mingo PituWhen Mrs Ziggy asked me what we are going to eat in Asturias three months before the trip, I just took a deep breath and smiled.  Where do I start?  We initially picked Asturias for its sheer beauty and the mesmerizing Picos de Europa.  The plan was to hike and explore and hope for some good Asturian food.  Food I didnt know much about a year ago.  I didnt realize we picked one of the most desirable, and respected cuisines in Spain.  José Andrés and many of the most famous Spanish chefs agree.  Andrés after all took Anthony Bourdain there on the final episodes of Parts Unknown.  And an entire chapter is devoted on Asturias in the excellent Grape, Olive, Pig: Deep Travels Through Spain’s Food Culture.  The pressure was on, to produce some memorable meals.

El Molín de Mingo at the foot of the Picos, became the first booking priority.  The seemingly middle of nowhere location, and the drive to it, meant you are not exactly going to a tourist trap.  The slightly terrified family, especially the kids in the back know the drill.  They’ve been there before.  Stay quiet, something good is coming.  On the drive back, we wondered if we ever took leftovers back on vacation.

El Molín de Mingo outside

If you think the portions are large in NYC, you should come to Asturias.  The notion that the bigger the plate the worst the quality is challenged here big time.  As usual our eyes were bigger than our stomachs and we ordered too much.  Leaving those plates there was criminal.  After the meal I spent many moments thinking about that Pitu in the hotel fridge, while driving the Asturias countryside.  Calculating and managing.  Thats how my mind works

We started with a local specialty I didnt know much about, Tortos de maiz.  A variety of fried tortilla-like flatbreads topped with either bacalao, chorizo, blood sausage, egg and ham, and cheese and caramelized onions.  All very good.  The mixed salad, we couldnt finish even though we ordered half, was especially fresh, and with roughly 17 different ingredients.  Since we already indulged in the Fabada a few times, we tried the Pote Asturiano this time.  Yet another delectable bean stew with collard greens and a variety of sausages on the side.

El Molín de Mingo Tortos

We didnt witness it but apparently there are these giant 7 feet chickens roaming around the area answering to the name Pitu.  Pitu Caleya Con Arroz, a rice dish made with those chickens is a local specialty and locals swear by El Molin de Mingo’s version.  Even local Michelin heavyweights try to replicate it.  Its unlike any stew you will ever eat. Nice depth, and simply addictive. You can almost taste the history and love that goes into the dish.   With that said, the Jabali Estofado, a slow roasted, super juicy wild boar with fried potato, was just as exceptional.  We took both home.

Reservations are a must.  English is limited so let your host make the reservations if you dont speak the language.  They are only open for 4 days a week.  Try to go for lunch since its tricky to get to.  This is a major Go!

El Molín de Mingo BeansEl Molín de Mingo Dessert

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Tia Pol – Just Basque a Move

Tia Pol Shrimp“If you want it, you got it.  You want it, baby you got it.  Just Basque a Move.  Yeah!” – Its been a while but pretty sure thats how that one goes.  Thats how I sing it it my head at least.  But the moves I’m busting these days are more like Elaine from Seinfeld-esqe.  Its more like a cross between twerking and wild prayer sways.  Still much work to be done, but I’m getting better at it.  There’s even a video circulating out there of me dancing, but there’s zero chance I’m sharing it here.  I got bullied enough as a kid.

The moves, the sways, and subsequent 911 calls get usually wilder after a fun meal.  And we had another one of those at Z-List darling Tia Pol the other day.  Its the most Spanish place I know.  Even if Rita Hayworth rolls in her grave every time someone orders a Gilda.  She rolls twice because it comes in twos (or at least everyone orders at least two).  But the fact that they even have Gilda, and things like green Gernika peppers on the menu says a lot about the place.  It may not be correct to call it Basque, as NYMag does, as it covers Catalan, Galician and other regions of Spain.  But its Basque enough, and perhaps one Galician Octopus, or Spanish style fried calamari (yep, best fried calamari is in Spain, not Italy) from covering the North of Spain rather nicely.

Tia Pol peppers

Tia Pol is tiny, and buzzy even on a lazy Saturday afternoon.  It subscribes to “If its not broke, why fix it formula”, serving pretty much the same menu since 2004.  The dishes to get today are still some of the same dishes we enjoyed 10 years ago.  New Orleans native Mani Dawes, who spent years happy munching in Madrid, knows a thing or two about Spanish food.  Madrid doesnt really have much of a cuisine, and draws much of its influences from the North, which is reflected all over the menu at Tia Pol.  Here’s a rundown of what we ate

Gilda – I’ll start with a mini (pun) rant.  Its hard to criticize a $2 snack but I’ll do it anyway.  Gilda is a popular pintxo eaten in Basque Country consisting of a single skewer of chili pepper, olive, anchovy, and pickles, usually served on a piece of bread.  The Basque people called it Gilda because its tall and skinny just like Rita Hayworth in their beloved Gilda that captured the nation back in the day.  Its not something that can be easily done here because we dont have fresh Spanish anchovies easily available, and for $2 a pop you just cant expect anything remotely close to the real thing.  But c’mon now.  This is not a Gilda, but a skinny Danny de Vito at best.  I suppose this might the best version we can come up with, but if you serve it to homesick Spaniards, they might start to weep, for the wrong reasons

Tia Pol Gilda

Pimientos Estilo Gernika – One of the more nonsensical comments that reviewers often make – “I can probably do this at home”.  Even if its true, is the point of eating out only to eat things you can not possibly make at home?  You are in full control of what you order.  But I love simple dishes, like the Miznon Cauliflower for example, that make you talk about possibly duplicating, and enhancing your life as a result.  The Gernika peppers that come blistered and simply sprinkled with sea salt, is such a dish.

Pinchos Morunos – Lamb skewers with Moorish spices, which means Cumin, Coriander, and all the goodies.  Gorgeously marinated and seasoned.  Get this!

Patatas Bravas – as solid as Bravas get in NYC

Tia Pol Patatas

Chorizo al Jerez – chorizo cooked in sherry and rosemary.  Chorizo, like Olives, is one of those things I like less than I think I do.  I keep ordering it, like olives, to see if maybe this is it, the grand chorizo, only to be mildly disappointed.  No exception here

Txipirones en su Tinta – This is it.  The dish I must get every time I’m here.  Squid cooked with its ink and a small hockey puck of rice.  It has that palatable inky sweetness, and the squid is never fishy.  Just wish that hockey puck was a little bigger.

Gambas al Ajillo – This is another dish I get all the time.  Its not going to win any shrimp in garlic awards, but its very garlicky and satisfying

Octopus Salad – Enjoyed in previous visits

Go!

Tia Pol
205 10th Ave (22/23), Chelsea
Rating: 2 Z’s (out of 4)
Stars range from Good to Exceptional. Simple as that.
Recommended Dishes: Patatas Bravas, Pimientos Estilo Gernika, Pinchos Morunos, Txipirones en su Tinta, Gambas al Ajillo

Categories: Chelsea, New York City | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

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